United Knowledge, Expert Care

Testicular Cancer

A relatively rare form of cancer, testicular cancer is most common in men aged between 15 and 49 years old. Often detected due to an abnormality of one or both testicles, regular self-examination is a good method of finding any irregularities at an early stage. Depending on the severity of the cancer, it might even be possible to retrieve sperm prior to treatment to facilitate conception at a later date. For a wide range of information on other issues and conditions related to the male reproductive system, please click here. Continue reading to learn more about testicular cancer and the possible treatments by reading LUA’s comprehensive guide.

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Testicular Cancer Causes

Testicular Cancer Symptoms

Testicular Cancer Treatment

Testicular Cancer Specialist

Contact LUA

Testicular Cancer Causes

  • Undescended testicles
  • Family history
  • Issues with fertility, including low sperm count

One of the known causes and most important risk factor of testes cancer is an undescended testicle. After birth or during the first year, the testicles move from a baby’s abdomen into their scrotum. When this doesn’t happen, and they either move down later in life or surgical intervention is needed to bring them down, the testicles are referred to as undescended. Men who required surgical intervention or with whom the problem has not yet been corrected carry a greater risk of developing testicular cancer.

If your family has a history of testes cancer or you are experiencing issues with male fertility, you also have an increased chance of developing this cancer in life. The fertility issues can range from low sperm count to a higher count of abnormal sperm – why and how fertility is linked to testicular cancer is still unknown.

Testicular Cancer Symptoms

  • A lump or increased firmness of a testicle
  • Swelling of a testicle
  • A sudden difference between the testicles
  • Pain, sharp or dull, in your scrotum or testicles

There are various symptoms associated with testicular cancer. Whilst some of the symptoms listed above might be harmless and related to another cause, it is always advised to get yourself checked once you experience one or more of the listed symptoms. In order to assess whether changes in your scrotum have occurred, regular self-examination is vital. Knowing what your testicles and scrotum usually feel like will enable you to spot when changes have occurred, including the appearance of a lump, a change in firmness or swelling of the testicle or other differences between testicles. For any concerns, please reach out to your health care professional for further assistance.

Testicular Cancer Treatment

After diagnosis of testicular cancer, performed by an ultrasound scan and performing blood tests called tumour markers, there might be various treatment options available to a patient dependent on the type of tumour uncovered.

One course of treatment involves removal of the testis through an inguinal or groin incision.  At the time the testicle is removed, an artificial testicular prosthesis can be placed within the scrotum.  It is often better to do this at the time of initial surgery.  Depending upon the type of tumour and whether other areas such as lymph nodes have been affected, further treatment may or may not be necessary.

There are of course rarer types of testicular tumour, including Leydig cell tumours, which may have a more benign course. These tumours will be assessed very carefully by the LUA’s testicular cancer specialist Mr Minhas. In certain cases, local excision or testes sparing surgery might be a treatment option. This is a specialised technique where ultrasound guidance is used to detect the tumour, so that the whole testis does not necessarily need to be removed.

Testicular Cancer Specialist

Mr Minhas is a urology consultant, specialised in the treatment of various urology conditions and issues related to the male reproductive system, including testes cancer. As a testicular cancer specialist, Mr Minhas can perform a procedure called TESE, where sperm is retrieved prior to any surgery or treatment of testicular cancer. Whether the TESE procedure is an option will depend entirely on the type of testicular cancer.

Contact LUA

If you're experiencing symptoms of testis cancer or have been recently diagnosed, please call 020 7224 5089 or use the appointment form to book a consultation at LUA.

 

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